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Long ago, when the world was young, Quetzalcoatl, the feathered serpent, traveled the universe in search of knowledge and beauty. On one of his trips, he arrived at a planet where a wonderful, bright yellow plant called corn grew. Quetzalcoatl was fascinated by corn, and wanted to take a sample to his world. But when he returned to earth, he realized that there was no one with whom to share his discovery. The world was empty of intelligent and sensitive beings, there were only animals, plants and stones. Quetzalcoatl felt alone and sad, and thought that he should create a new species, one that would be able to appreciate corn and everything he had learned. So he took an ear of corn, and ground it with his hands. Then, he added a little water, and it formed a soft, pliable dough. With that mass, he modeled the figure of a man, and blew on his face, giving him life. Then, he did the same to create a woman. And thus, the first human beings were born, made of corn and water. Quetzalcoatl felt happy and proud of his work, and he gave the men the rest of the corn he had brought, and taught them how to grow it, care for it, and harvest it. He told them that corn was the sacred food, that it would give them strength and life, and that it would make them different from animals. He told them that corn was the gift of Ometeotl, the supreme god, and that they should thank and honor him. The men felt grateful and happy, and followed the teachings of Quetzalcoatl. Corn became the sustenance of his life, and the symbol of his culture. Men multiplied and populated the earth, and they venerated Quetzalcoatl as their father and teacher. But over time, men became curious and ambitious, and began to question the origin of corn and themselves. They wondered how it was possible that Quetzalcoatl had taught them corn, if they themselves were made of corn. They wondered how it was possible that Quetzalcoatl had made them with corn, if he had discovered corn himself in another world. And thus, the Quetzalcoatl paradox was formed, which no one could solve. Was corn the origin of men, or were men the origin of corn? Was corn the gift of the gods, or were the gods the gift of corn? Men looked for answers in books, in temples, in dreams, but they did not find them. Some became skeptical and rebellious, and stopped believing in Quetzalcoatl and corn. Others became fanatical and violent, and wanted to impose their vision of corn and the gods. And others became indifferent and forgetful, and distanced themselves from corn and its culture. Quetzalcoatl, who was observing everything from the sky, was saddened to see the confusion and conflict that his paradox had caused. He regretted having created men with corn, and having taught them corn. He thought that perhaps it would have been better to leave the corn on the planet where he found it, and leave the men alone. But it was too late to change the past. Quetzalcoatl could only hope that one day, men would find harmony and wisdom, and that they would understand the true meaning of corn and the paradox of it.

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 The legend of the paradox of Quetzalcóatl part I the meaning of corn and its paradox.
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