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Many years passed, and men continued to live on the land, divided and confronted by the paradox of corn. Some adored him, others despised him, and others ignored him. The corn was lost, and with it, the connection with Quetzalcóatl and Ometeotl. But there was a man who did not conform to any of those attitudes. His name was Tlaloc, and he was a wise and brave young man, who wanted to know the truth about corn and the gods. Tlaloc dedicated himself to studying ancient books, temples, dreams, and everything that could give him a clue about the paradox of Quetzalcoatl. One day, Tlaloc had a revelation. He realized that the paradox was not a problem, but an opportunity. He realized that corn and men were one, and that corn and the gods were one. He realized that corn was the bridge between men and gods, and that corn was the path to wisdom and harmony. Tlaloc decided to share his discovery with other men, and invited them to follow him in his search for corn and the gods. But not everyone listened to him. Some mocked him, some attacked him, and some ignored him. Only a few followed him, and they formed a small group of seekers. Tlaloc and his followers set out and traveled around the world in search of corn. They searched in the fields, in the mountains, in the forests, in the rivers, in the seas, in the caves, in the stars. They searched everywhere, but they did not find the corn. Tlaloc was not discouraged, and he continued searching. He thought that perhaps the corn was hidden in some secret place, or that perhaps he had returned to the planet where Quetzalcoatl had found it. He thought that perhaps he should travel through space and time, as Quetzalcoatl had done, and visit other worlds and other dimensions. But he didn‘t know how to do it. He did not have the powers of Quetzalcoatl, nor did he know how to use them. Then, he got an idea. He thought that perhaps he could summon Quetzalcoatl, and ask him to help him. He thought that perhaps Quetzalcoatl would be willing to listen to him, and guide him. So Tlaloc prepared to perform a sacred ritual, which consisted of offering an offering of corn to Quetzalcóatl. But there was a problem: he didn‘t have corn. He had searched all over the world, and he had not found a single ear of grain. How could he offer corn to Quetzalcoatl, if he did not have corn? Then, Tlaloc remembered something he had read in one of the ancient books. He remembered that men had been made of corn and water, by Quetzalcoatl. He remembered that men were corn, and that corn was men. And he had an idea. Tlaloc took a knife and cut his hand. He let the blood flow, and collected it in a container. Then he took some dirt and mixed it with the blood. Thus, he formed a red and moist mass, with which he molded the figure of an ear of corn. Tlaloc breathed on the figure, and gave it life. Thus, he created an ear of corn, with blood and earth. Tlaloc was happy, and placed the ear of corn on an altar. Then, he spoke some words of invocation, and called Quetzalcoatl. He asked him to manifest himself, and to show him the way to the corn and to the gods. And Quetzalcoatl heard his call, and appeared before him. Quetzalcoatl was surprised to see Tlaloc, and to see the ear of corn that he had offered him. Quetzalcoatl recognized the ear of corn, and realized that it was the same one that he had brought from another world, and with which he had made men. Quetzalcóatl became excited, and approached Tlaloc. Quetzalcoatl told Tlaloc that he was proud of him, and that he had resolved the paradox. He told him that corn and men were one, and that corn and the gods were one. He told her that corn was the bridge between men and gods, and that corn was the path to wisdom and harmony. Quetzalcóatl told Tlaloc to accompany him, and that he would take him to know corn and the gods. He told him that he would take him to travel through space and time, and visit other worlds and other dimensions. He told her that she would make her his disciple, and that he would teach her everything he knew. Tlaloc felt happy, and accepted Quetzalcóatl‘s invitation. He said goodbye to his followers, and told them that he was waiting for them in the corn. Then, he left with Quetzalcoatl, and his great adventure began.

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 The legend of the paradox of Quetzalcóatl part II of how Tlaloc found corn and the gods
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